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Water Conservation

Grade Level: 4-6

Subject: Science

Time Frame: Two or three, 45-minute class period(s)

Overview:  In this lesson students will explore the different types of water reserves present on this planet and the reasons why, on a “blue planet”, fresh water is still a scarce resource that needs to be preserved and protected.  Students will examine the ways in which water is used in their everyday lives and the simple measures that they can take in their every day lives that can make big differences to the amount of water they use.  Finally students will link the need for water conservation back to what they’ve learned about the importance of freshwater inputs to maintaining healthy estuarine ecosystems within the Barnegat Bay.

Image Source: http://images.suite101.com/797434_com_tapdrip.jpg  

NJ Core Content Standards

STANDARD 4.1 (NUMBER AND NUMERICAL OPERATIONS) ALL STUDENTS WILL DEVELOP NUMBER SENSE AND WILL PERFORM STANDARD NUMERICAL OPERATIONS AND ESTIMATIONS ON ALL TYPES OF NUMBERS IN A VARIETY OF WAYS.

4.1.8 A. Number Sense

1. Extend understanding of the number system by constructing meanings for

o         Percents

2. Demonstrate a sense of the relative magnitudes of numbers.

3. Understand and use ratios, rates, proportions, and percents (including percents greater than 100 and less than 1) in a variety of situations.  

STANDARD 4.2 (GEOMETRY AND MEASUREMENT) ALL STUDENTS WILL DEVELOP SPATIAL SENSE AND THE ABILITY TO USE GEOMETRIC PROPERTIES, RELATIONSHIPS, AND MEASUREMENT TO MODEL, DESCRIBE AND ANALYZE PHENOMENA.

4.2.6 D. Units of Measurement

            Select and use appropriate units to measure … volume.

STANDARD 4.5 (MATHEMATICAL PROCESSES) ALL STUDENTS WILL USE MATHEMATICAL PROCESSES OF PROBLEM SOLVING, COMMUNICATION, CONNECTIONS, REASONING, REPRESENTATIONS, AND TECHNOLOGY TO SOLVE PROBLEMS AND COMMUNICATE MATHEMATICAL IDEAS.

4.5 A. Problem Solving

            Learn mathematics through problem solving, inquiry, and discovery.

            Solve problems that arise in mathematics and in other contexts.

C.      Connections

Recognize that mathematics is used in a variety of contexts outside of mathematics.

STANDARD 5.8 (EARTH SCIENCE) ALL STUDENTS WILL GAIN AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE STRUCTURE, DYNAMICS, AND GEOPHYSICAL SYSTEMS OF THE EARTH.

5.8.6 B. Atmosphere and Water

1. Describe the composition, circulation, and distribution of the world’s oceans, estuaries, and marine environments.

2. Describe and illustrate the water cycle.

Standard 5.10. (Environmental Studies)  ALL STUDENTS WILL DEVELOP AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE ENVIRONMENT AS A SYSTEM OF INTERDEPENDENT COMPONENTS AFFECTED BY HUMAN ACTIVITY AND NATURAL PHENOMENA

5.10.6 B. Human Interactions and Impact

1. Describe the effect of human activities on various ecosystems.

2. Evaluate the impact of personal activities on the local environment

STANDARD 6.6 (GEOGRAPHY) ALL STUDENTS WILL APPLY UNDERSTANDING KNOWLEDGE OF SPATIAL RELATIONSHIPS AND OTHER GEOGRAPHIC SKILLS TO UNDERSTAND HUMAN BEHAVIOR IN RELATION TO THE PHYSICAL AND CULTURAL ENVIRONMENT.

6.6.8 B. Places and Regions

1. Compare and contrast the physical and human characteristics of places in regions in New Jersey, the United States, and the world.

4. Explain how regional systems are interconnected (e.g., watersheds, trade, transportation systems)..

6.6.8 C. Physical Systems

1. Analyze the impact of various human activities and social policies on the natural environment and describe how humans have attempted to solve environmental problems through adaptation and modification.

4. Compare and contrast various ecosystems and describe their interrelationship and interdependence.

5. Describe world, national, and local patterns of resource distribution and utilization, and discuss the political and social impact.

6.6.8 E. Environment and Society

1. Analyze the impact of various human activities and social policies on the natural environment and describe how humans have attempted to solve environmental problems through adaptation and modification.

4. Compare and contrast various ecosystems and describe their interrelationship and interdependence.

5. Describe world, national, and local patterns of resource distribution and utilization, and discuss the political and social impact.

STANDARD 9.2 (CONSUMER, FAMILY, AND LIFE SKILLS) ALL STUDENTS WILL DEMONSTRATE CRITICAL LIFE SKILLS IN ORDER TO BE FUNCTIONAL MEMBERS OF SOCIETY.

9.2.8 A. Critical Thinking

1. Communicate, analyze data, apply technology, and problem solve.

2. Describe how personal beliefs and attitudes affect decision-making.

9.2.8 B. Self-Management

2. Demonstrate responsibility for personal actions and contributions to group activities.

9.2.8 C. Interpersonal Communication

1. Demonstrate respect and flexibility in interpersonal and group situations.

2. Organize thoughts to reflect logical thinking and speaking.

3. Work cooperatively with others to solve a problem.

4. Demonstrate appropriate social skills within group activities.

5. Practice the skills necessary to avoid physical and verbal confrontation in individual and group settings.

6. Participate as a member of a team and contribute to group effort.

Multiple Intelligences Spatial, Kinesthetic, Linguistic, Interpersonal. Logical/Mathematical, Naturalistic 

Materials

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·        Water

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·        Salt (optional)

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·        4- 1,000 mL graduated cylinders (or other liter containers if needed)

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·        2- 50 mL graduated cylinders

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·        1 or 2 - 10 mL graduated cylinder

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·        1 small shallow dish (to hold 1 mL)

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·        2-3 eye droppers or pipettes

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·        Globe or world map

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·        Inflatable beach ball or similar soft, throwable object (optional)

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·        Graphic of water reserves (pasted below)

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·        Water facts printed on slips and cut out for students

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·        Booklet printouts from WaterLion website for every student  http://sftrc.cas.psu.edu/LessonPlans/Water/PDFs/4HWaterLion.pdf).

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·        Water-droplet-shaped pieces of colored paper, each large enough to write a full sentence on

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·        Image of Barnegat Bay to present overhead or poster / map of bay for water droplets to be placed on

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·        Sticky-tac for sticking completed the water droplets on poster/overhead image

Learning Objectives

SWBAT:

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Describe the various ways in which water is used in their homes and communities

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Apply what was learned from previous lessons to explain why water needs to be conserved in terms of the health of the Barnegat Bay

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Investigate possible ways to conserve water

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Collaborate with classmates to develop a list of things they and their families can do conserve water in their everyday lives

Anticipatory Set                              

While the students are settling in their seats waiting for the lesson to begin, the teacher will catch their attention by singing the following to the of “Row, Row, Row Your Boat” (source:  http://fcs.tamu.edu/housing/4h/songs.pdf)

 

Gallon, Gallons, Gallons

Drops, drops, drippety drops,

Drizzling down the drain,

It’s my job to turn it off,

I want to save that rain!

 

Cups, cups, cups of water,

Running down the drain,

It’s my job to turn it off,

I want to save that rain!

 

Gallons, gallons, gallons of water

Rushing down the drain,

It’s our job to turn it off,

We all have much to gain.

 

Sequence of events (adapted from http://www.schoolship.org/files/inlandseas/661.pdf)

1) Teacher will ask the students to volunteer information from the previous lessons they have learned which explained why its important that people living in the Bay’s watershed conserve water.

2) Teacher will ask students if they know or can guess what percentage of all the water on Earth is in a form that can be used for human consumption.

3) Students will write down their answers. (Teacher may want to remind students to use prior knowledge from previous lessons about water, the water cycle, and watershed.)

4) A few students should be asked to volunteer to share their answers to demonstrate the large range of what most students think they have to use (probably a lot).

5) One of these student volunteers will be invited will to pour water from a 1,000 mL graduated cylinder in a second graduated cylinder to represent the amount of water that represents the percentage of Earth's water available for human use that they just shared with the class (this may take some discussion with the class about how to convert the target percentage to a volume in this context).

6) Once this is done, the class should discuss whether or not they think the amount of water that the volunteer chose was correct.  If not, alternatives should be sought until there is at least general consensus on the percentage and thus the volume that should be in the second cylinder.

7) Teacher will mark the estimate on the side of the graduated cylinder with a sharpie or other quasi permanent marker.

8) Teacher will explain to students that he / she will now demonstrate the amount of water in the Earth and will see how close the students were in correctly estimating the amount of water that’s really available to human use. 

9)      Teacher will start by refilling the first 1,000 mL graduated cylinder and reminding the class that, just like last time, this represents the total amount of water found in any form on planet earth.

10)  Teacher will then choose another volunteer and ask him / her to pour 28 ml into a third 1,000 mL graduated cylinder.

11)  Teacher will explain that this represents the total amount of fresh water present on planet Earth and that the remaining 972 mL left in the first graduated cylinder represents the saltwater found in the Earth’s oceans.  You may want to mix some salt in to this water to make the point  (If you add 34 g which is a little less than 6 teaspoonfuls of salt to this amount of water you will create a solution that is 35 ppt, or about the same salinity as seawater)

12)  The same, or an additional student can be chosen to pour 23 mL of the 28 mL from the third graduated cylinder into a 50 mL graduated cylinder.

13)  Teacher can explain to students that the 23 mL represents the water that’s locked up in icecaps and glaciers and so isn’t available for humans to use in their homes and communities.

14)  The remaining 5 mL in the original 1000mL cylinder is the water that’s available to humans for their use.

15)  The same or yet another student can be chosen and asked to pour 4 of the 5 ml in another container.

16)  Teacher will explain to students that this represent groundwater (the water in soils and aquifers).

17)  A final student can be chosen to pour the remaining 1 ml in the container into a shallow dish.

18)  Teacher will hand that student a pipette and ask the student to suck the remaining water up into it.   Then the student should dispense 2 drops from the dropper.  This represents the water in all of the lakes and streams on the entire planet (i.e. surface water).  The student should then dispense the remaining1 drop.  This represents all of the water in the atmosphere including clouds.

19)  Teacher will present students with the image (supplied below) representing the same concept that was taught with the water demonstration.

20)  Teacher will prompt students with questions reviewing the information they just were presented e.g..

a.       Where is most of the water on Earth found?

b.      Why can we not use that water to drink, shower in or to water lawns or crops?

c.       Can salt be removed from water?

d.      Of the four containers of fresh water (ice caps, groundwater, surface water, atmosphere / clouds), which has the largest store of fresh water in it?

e.       Do we commonly use water from this source to drink, shower in or to water lawns or crops?  If not, why not?

f.        Looking at a globe or map, where are some of the largest reserves of fresh water

Answers

  1. Oceans

  2. B/c the salt in it is toxic to us (and tastes bad) and kills most plants).

  3. Yes. But the process, which is called desalination is very expensive.  Its also only useful for communities on the coast.  For people who live in the middle of the Continent the ocean is too far away for desalination to help, even if they were willing to pay for the process.

  4. Polar ice caps and glaciers

  5. No.  Ice is expensive to harvest, and most of it is also too far away from where most people live to be helpful

  6. Great lakes, Lake Victoria, Lake Baikal etc.  (teacher may want to tell students that America and Canada are fortunate in having the Great Lakes within their boundaries since these water bodies contain fully 20% of the world’s surface water supply)

21)  Students will be prompted to explain why the demonstration they just did relates to the need for water conservation. (The main idea students should understand is that there is a limited and small quantity of fresh water available to us, so we need to take care of it and not waste or pollute it.)

22)  Teacher should emphasize that everyone needs water and that it is ok to use water when needed, but we need to make sure we aren’t wasting it.

23)  Students will be prompted to each think and write down a list of different ways that they use fresh water independently. As students write, the teacher should jog their memories by asking students to think about where water is used in school, at home, or outside.

24)  Students will then form groups of four to share their ideas, and come up with other ones.

25)   Teacher should then have students share their ideas with the class.  To make the sharing more fun, teacher can have the students stand.  He / she could then toss out an inflatable ball to a student who would then share an idea from their list, and then toss the ball to another student to share an idea that has not yet been mentioned.  After each student shares an idea,  he / she should sit and would then not be allowed to catch the ball again.  If a student shares an idea that was already shared, he / she should be offered the option to share another idea.  When most or all of the ideas have been shared the game should stop.

26)  Students will then be handed out a slip of paper with a “water fact” on it to share with the rest of the class (supplied).

27)  The students should  return to their groups and talk about ways in which water may be wasted if use inappropriately for each of the uses on their list.  These can include ideas that arise from the water facts that they’ve just heard or ideas that they generate from their own experiences

28)  Students will each receive a print out of the WaterLion booklet (supplied on website:      http://sftrc.cas.psu.edu/LessonPlans/Water/PDFs/4HWaterLion.pdf).

29)  The class can read the four first pages together while students volunteer/chosen to read aloud. Or, to promote learning comprehension, each group can read an assigned page in the pamphlet and share the highlights with the rest of the class in sequential order of the groups’ assigned page.

30)  Students will choose one of the four activities supplied in the booklet to do and report back with the class the following day. OR The class as a whole will do all the activities together as assigned by teacher.

31)  Students will discuss ways in which they, their families or communities can reduce their water use with the guidance of the teacher.  

32)  Students will write in LARGE letters one thing that they “pledge” to do at home, at school or elsewhere in their lives which will reduce their own or their family’s water use on a piece of colored paper cut out in the shape of a water drop and place it on a large poster board or projected image of the Barnegat Bay.

33)  Students will be prompted to remember the connection between these ‘freshwater droplets’ of conserved water and the health of the Barnegat Bay. (When people conserve water, the water they don’t waste is able to run to the Bay and create the unique brackish water habitat needed by the unique animals and plants that live in the estuary.)

 

Assessment

Collect students lists of water uses and ways to save water as well as their worksheet from the closing activity below to assess the effectiveness of students’ learning in this unit.

 

Closing Activity

Students will be given the ‘Someone who…’ fill-in sheet (below) to complete while moving around the classroom.  Students should be reminded that they need to be honest and that each should sign their names on at least three other people’s sheets.


 

Find Someone Who...

(Source http://learningtogive.org/lessons/unit382/lesson1_attachments/2.html)

    ... can list three different ways to save water. 

Way 1:

 

Way 2:

 

Way 3:

 

Signature of source:

  ..... can tell give one reason why having a strong flow of surface and groundwater into the Barnegat Bay is important.

REASON:

 

 

 

Signature of source:

   ....  can give one reason why it is important to conserve water. 

REASON:

 

 

Signature of source:


 

Extension Ideas

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·         Have students create a poster, trifold or other such outreach material and assign them to use it to share what they’ve learned with families or friends.  Alternately, have students work to create a presentation on water conservation that can be made to other students within their school during an assembly or other group  meeting

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Invite a guest speaker from the local water conservation department to come to your class and speak to them about where the water used in their homes and school comes from, how it’s treated, where it goes when it leaves their homes and so forth, as well as addressing specific water supply challenges and water conservation needs within their communities. Useful Contacts in the Ocean County Area: 

 o        United Water of Toms River. 200 Old Hook Road, Harrington Park, NJ 07640. PHONE: 201-767-9300  http://www.unitedwater.com/tomsriver/contact-us.aspx

o        Brick MUA.  Rob Karl, Source Water Administrator. Brick Municipal Utility Authority, 1551 Highway 88 West, Brick, NJ 08724.  PHONE: 732-458-7000, ext. 271 WEB SITE: http://www.brickmua.com

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      Teacher can teach/play/sing songs about water conservation http://fcs.tamu.edu/housing/4h/songs.pdf

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      Have students complete a water conservation word search puzzle: http://www.njawwa.org/kidsweb/wordfind/wordfind.htm

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       Increases in population and industrial growth are straining water resources around the world and making the need for water management more urgent. Show students the Water Conservation: Israel QuickTime Video and the Water Conservation: Mexico QuickTime Video. Discuss the following questions
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    What water problems are faced by Israel? By Mexico?

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    What water conservation techniques does each country use?

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     What are some unanticipated consequences of each of these techniques?

source for last activity http://sftrc.cas.psu.edu/LessonPlans/Water/Conservation.html)

Resources

Image for use in reviewing results of water volume exercise.

C:\Users\Amanda\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\Temporary Internet Files\Low\Content.IE5\0CW8VAAD\01_water_quantity_large[1].jpg

 

Water facts for use in information sharing exercise:  (http://www.sscwd.org/tips.html; http://www.chelanpud.org/water-trivia.html.  We hope we’ve provided more ideas than you’ll need for your class so that you can choose ideas that are of particular interest to / suitable for your group.

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Water is the only substance on earth that is found naturally in three forms: solid, liquid and gas

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To stay hydrated a typical person should drink about 8 cups of water per day. A drop of just 2% drop in the amount of water in your body can trigger fuzzy short-term memory, trouble with basic math, and difficulty focusing on the computer screen

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One quarter of the water used inside a typical home is used for flushing the toilet.  Every flush of the toilet uses about 5 gallons of water. If everyone in the US flushed the toilet just one less time per day, we could save a lake full of water about one mile long, one mile wide and four feet deep each day.

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If you let the cold tap run until it gets cold before filling your glass to drink from it, nearly 2 gallons of water go down the drain while you are waiting.

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If you add up all the water used to make the things that we use every day (produce our food, make our clothes, power and so forth), as well as that we use directly in our homes the average American uses approximately 1,668 gallons of freshwater every day.  In Australia, the average daily use is 876 gallons. In Great Britain they use approximately 185 gallons per day and in Switzerland they only use 77 gallons per person per day.

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A toilet that “runs” (leaks) between flushes wastes about 200 gallons of water per day.  Fortunately such leaks are easily and inexpensively fixed by even the most inexperienced do-it-yourselfer.  The trick is to get motivated and do it as soon as you notice the problem, rather than jiggling the handle and hoping the problem will go away on its own!

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The average American family spends $500 per year on its water and sewer bill, so saving water can save your family money as well as helping the environment

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Every glass of water brought to your table in a restaurant requires another two glasses of water to wash and rinse the glass. Since nearly 70 million meals are served each day in US restaurants, we'd save more than 26 million gallons of water if only one person in four declined the complimentary glassful.

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A leaky faucet can waste 100 gallons a day.  If every household in America had a faucet that dripped once each second, 928 million gallons of water a day would leak away.

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An automatic dishwasher uses 9 to 12 gallons of water while hand washing dishes can use up to 20 gallons. If you must wash a bunch of dishes by hand, you can conserve water by filling one sink or basin with soapy water and quickly rinsing each item under a slow-moving stream from the faucet

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An average bath requires 37 gallons of water. The average 5-minute shower takes 15-25 gallons of water. As a result, taking short showers instead of baths can save gallons of water per day.

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You use about 5 gallons of water if you leave the water running while brushing your teeth.

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The agriculture industry is the largest user of water in the world today. It accounts for 70% of all fresh water used every year,

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It takes 39,000 gallons of water to produce the average car, including its tires.  

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Almost 1,800 gallons of water are needed to produce the cotton in a pair of jeans and 400 gallons to produce the cotton in a shirt.  

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Nearly 1,400 gallons of water are used to produce a meal of a quarter-pound hamburger, an order of fries and a soft drink.  

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Producing an average-sized Sunday newspaper requires about 150 gallons of water

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About 800,000 new water wells are drilled each year in the United States for domestic, farming, commercial, and water testing purposes.

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For every glass of water provided for a guest in a restaurant, it takes two more glasses of water to wash that glass.  Almost a quart of water per glass can thus be saved by just having restaurants only provide water to guests who request it

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 It takes about 1,000 gallons of water to grow the wheat to make a 2-pound loaf of bread, and about 120 gallons to produce one egg. Approximately 48,000 gallons are needed to produce the typical American Thanksgiving dinner for eight people

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More than half of the water we use in the warmer months is used for outdoor irrigation, so taking actions that mean you have to water less can help a lot with water conservation.  For example, if you water your lawn too lightly, it prevents water from getting deep into the soil. The grass then develops shallower roots and becomes less drought-resistant. It's better to deep soak your grass, but then water it less frequently. Water your lawn only when it needs it. If you step on the grass and it springs back up when you move, it doesn’t need water. If it stays flat, it does need water.

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Lawns do not have to be watered every day. Lawn care specialists can provide the necessary information for proper lawn care in your area. Do not water at mid-day. The water drops form tiny magnifiers on the grass resulting in burned grass. Evaporation increases at this time. Watering at night causes fungus to form on the plants. The best time to water is just after sunrise and before sunset. In most cases lawns need only to be watered once per week. Newly seeded or sodded areas require more frequent watering.

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Native plantings require little or no commercial fertilization after establishment because they are naturally adapted to our soil and climate. By replacing lawn area, they reduce the fertilized area of your yard. Not only are native plants attractive, they provide diversity to your lawn and increase the depth of your soil root profile, thus helping to filter more harmful pollutants out of the groundwater before they reach the Bay.

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Leave grass clippings on your lawn. This is referred to as "mulch mowing", and some lawn mowers are specially designed to do this. Whether or not you use a "mulch mower", grass clippings are a complete fertilizer and provide your lawn with a natural fertilizer source and improve your soil quality by adding valuable organic matter. Ask your lawn care professional to leave the clippings on the lawn.

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Plant clover or low nitrogen grasses. Clover fixes nitrogen from the air, which fertilizes your lawn naturally. Clover is resistant to pests and weeds, drought tolerant, and requires less mowing than typical turf grass species. Clover and grass seed mixes are readily available at most garden supply stores. Other species of grass such as “alkaligrass” and many members of the “fine fescue” family need less water and virtually no fertilizer to thrive. Ask your local garden supplier for a grass seed from these families or checkout Low Maintenance Landscaping produced by the at Rutgers Agricultural Extension for more great grass tips.

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Xeriscaping (pronounced zeerascaping) is the centuries-old gardening technique of using plants that are both beautiful and require little or no watering or maintenance – otherwise known as native plants. Rainfall already contains nitrogen from the atmosphere. When it falls on a “stone lawn”, the rain water runs off into the Bay without the nitrogen being removed by plants. If you have a yard, maybe your family could give “xeriscaping" a try!

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Let the grass grow longer.  Grass is healthiest when it is allowed to grow to a height of about 3 inches. When the grass is left to grow a little longer, it puts down deeper roots. These roots will help the grass to stay healthy during the hot summer months because they will pull water up to the plant from deeper in the soil.

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After a moderate rainfall of 3/4", a typical thunderstorm, no watering should be necessary for 4 days.

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Fertilizer can pollute water, making it unsuitable for human use as well as creating problems for the plants and animals of rivers, lakes and the Bay when it washes into those systems. Do not fertilize when rain is expected in the next 24 hours. Rainwater not only leaches polluting nitrogen into the Bay, it also removes the fertilizer from your lawn, robbing the grass of the nutrients you just applied. If you have a sprinkler, water sparingly after fertilization and only irrigate in the morning or evening. Watering during the midday is wasteful, as the water merely evaporates.

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Fertilizer should not be used within 10 feet of streams, creeks, or the Bay. Much of the fertilizer applied in this area washes into these water bodies. If you are lucky enough to live near the water, respect it. Areas near the water are ideal for native plantings that don’t need to be fertilized.

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Getting a cover for your pool can help prevent evaporation. An averaged-size pool with average sun and wind exposure loses approximately 1,000 gallons of water per month. A pool cover cuts the loss by 90%.

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Swimming pools do not have to be emptied each fall and filled in the spring. The average permanent, in-ground pool holds 35,000 gallons. This water can be left in the pool over the winter without ice damage to the sides of the pool. This can be accomplished by placing several wooden logs (or expansion devices) in the pool to absorb the ice expansion and covering the pool with a thermal blanket.

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By 2025, two-thirds of the world’s population - or 5.3 billion people - will suffer from water shortages.

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Right now, 1.1 billion people - or one in six people worldwide - do not have access to clean water.

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Every year, 1.8 million children die from waterborne diseases; that is one every 15 seconds. Water-related diseases caused by contaminated water and inadequate sanitation are responsible for 80% of all illness in the developing world.

Other Resources

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A water conservation guide for kids with some great ways to learn to save water and some fun activities:  http://www.thewaterpage.com/water-conservation-kids.htm (thanks to Mrs. Miller's class at Valley Charter School in Northern California for bringing this excellent resource to our attention).

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Great list of things that one can do to save water: http://www.prepare.org/basic/Conserve.pdf

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Ideas for games to play with your students: http://www.wateruseitwisely.com/_downloads/Water-Wisdom.pdf  and http://www.thirteen.org/h2o/resources_games.html

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The Digital Library for Earth System Education (www.dlese.org) offers a number of additional resources on this topic as does http://www.teachersdomain.org/resource/ess05.sci.ess.watcyc.lp_waterconservation/

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United Water's Water Conservation Pages  http://www.unitedwater.com/conservation.aspx

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Source Water Stewardship Report for the Metedeconk River: http://www.tpl.org/tier3_cd.cfm?content_item_id=13743&folder_id=629

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Water Supply Issues in NJ's Coastal Plain Region: http://marine.rutgers.edu/cousteau/coastal_training/resources/workshops/water_supply_workshop.pdf

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Water conservation tips created during the 2005 drought: http://www.njdrought.org/ideas.html

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Water Conservation Letter to the Mayor of Howell, NJ. http://www.twp.howell.nj.us/content/58/1389/default.aspx

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Water Use It Wisely http://www.wateruseitwisely.com/

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Earth 911 http://earth911.org/water/water-conservation/

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H2Ouse Water Saver Home http://www.h2ouse.org/

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25 Ways to Save Water at Home http://www.eartheasy.com/live_water_saving.htm

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Rutgers University, Soil and Water conservation fact sheets:  http://njaes.rutgers.edu/pubs/subcategory.asp?cat=6&sub=49

 

TEACHER FEEDBACK REQUEST:  We are always to working to improve these lesson plans. If you use this lesson plan, we'd love to hear from you with your thoughts, comments and suggestions for future improvements.  Please take the time to fill in our survey at http://www.zoomerang.com/Survey/?p=WEB229JAHPF748.  Thanks!

 

 © 2009.  Amanda Traina (Author), Louise Wootton (Editor)

 

    

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